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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the till look -- tillamook burn. never. we used to have a very high rate of employment, with a relatively high average, annual salary when the mills were operating. we no longer have mills. what in the hell are we doign to this -- doing to this state? >> do you want to share any thoughts on the east side forest plan my colleague has been trying to put together to get out of this deadlock? >> it all works soemtimes. -- sometimes. but every time that something gets going, it goes to the courts. we are stymied. >> thank you very much. whenever i am hiding in that area, you often see -- hiking in that area, you often see completely overgrown, second- growth forests that are not serving their purpose and are often a source of disease, a potential fire hazard. it is a lose-lose-lose situation. there are a number of things that we need to push forward on. one is the thinning which produces a steady supply of logs, better timber stands, and improves the ecosystem. nothing moves past in this world, but another piece was -- senator wyden and i thought to get money to help for us to thinning. a seco
of the second world war. and the fact that the u.s. army deems it a threat, enough to vaccinate all u.s. troops who are deployed into the arenas of war, i think it's a very real threat. and absolutely out of all the arsenals of biological weapons, it's the most effective because it's hardy resistance. it's a real threat and billions of dollars are spent on coming up with defenses against anthrax. >> despite the amount of spending to date, are we any safer today? and how easy is it for a group to make anthrax and deploy it? >> the paradox of the whole situation is that in the effort to combat possible use of anthrax by a terrorist organization, we've seen an enormous expansion and proliferation of laboratories and personnel who are allowed to work with these so called select agents of which anthrax is one of them. and as security has been lax and oversight has seen accidents and mistakes and lack of event controls, what you have is a real life situation that is far less safe than i think we were a few years ago. and as the government activities proliferate, the chance that terrorists or someone
marciano introduces us to these combat weatherman. >>> and the a.m. fix block is up and running as it is every day. join the live conversation, go to >>> it has been one bruising night on the island of bermuda. igor roared right past the coast overnight, missing direct landfall by just 40 miles. >> it's a large hurricane generating enormous waves. it's pummelling the island with powerful winds, driving rain, trees there are shredded, power lines are down. cnn is your hurricane headquarters, rob marciano is here in new york. first, though, let's go to the scene, reynolds wolf live in elbow beach, bermuda. looks like not a good time there this morning. >> reporter: well, things are improving compared to last night where the brunt of the storm really came just to our west around 11:00 local time through midnight, really the worst of it. this storm, although it did not make a direct hit, you've got to remember that bermuda is a small area. and this storm when you include the outflow is nearly 1,000 miles wide. when you think about bermuda, it's not one island, but 138
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
a reporter, i am all about news you can use. on this panel, we have hand- selected amazing folks, each an expert in the runway on different angles of reintegration within the military and the civilian world. i am going to bounce around a little bit. out of courtesy, i like to start with our wounded warriors. front and center, we have michael. he is a recently retired wounded warrior. he has a long medical road ahead. as a former army ranger and sergeant first class, michael is adapting to this change in mission. between ongoing surgery's, he is speaking to troops about reintegration and suicide prevention, even going back to iraq, where he was hit by an ied to talk to troops. optimisticht iis his mother and full-time caregiver. they have been blessed because she says when you look at mike, she worries about those who have unseen injuries and their families in need help reintegrating. down on me and, we have -- down on the end, we have a former marine reservist. she brings a unique perspective on reintegration trade as a female wounded warrior, as a full-time student, and as eight men t
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
with the president and joins us now from the u. good morning, bill. >> reporter: good morning, harry. the president will make a plea for mid east peace today. meanwhile at the white house, he expected midterm staff shake-up seems to be under way. president obama's inner circle appears to be moving on, out of the west wing. cbs news has learned david axelrod, his closest political adviser will move to chicago next spring to take part in the campaign for re-election in 2012, a potential replacement for him, press secretary robert gibbs. the dominos don't stop there. rahm emanuel, his chief of staff, may leave the white house as soon as next months. he's told colleagues he is very likely to run for mayor of chicago. gibbs told reporters on air force one i'm not going to rule anything in orot. he's in the process of thinking through what's best for rahm, as the president addresses the general assembly this week to focus on america's place as a global leader. >> now, let me be clear, the united states of america has been and will remain the global leader in providing assistance. we will not abandon thos
spurred that the national and local level the u.s. will lose. what do you think? the numbers to call -- you can also e-mail us. and we are on twitter. "curb corruption or lose the war" from "the wall street journal." the author of "why vietnam matters. " he draws on his own experience in vietnam. he starts out by saying -- so, what do you think? curb corruption or losing the war? will that be putting the american effort in jeopardy in afghanistan? "the wall street journal" has this piece. the piece says -- our question for you this morning, is there a danger in the u.s. losing the war in afghanistan do to problems of corruption, and bought more perhaps by the cia, trying to do the right thing and aligning itself with informants, but did they take advantage of the system? "the washington post" has an excerpt modified from "obama's wars." uc and in this year, president obama visiting arlington national -- you see in this here, president obama visiting arlington national cemetery. the peace in "the washington post" says -- so, we are seeing a little bit of the behind-the-scenes give- an
europeans, they were well educated, emigrating to the u.s.. last year there were only three within the group by participated in. my colleague graduated in u.s., spending $200,000 of her own money on education. she went back to europe, and in these other countries that have no immigration -- no education and the immigration is a policy provided to the u.s.. guest: our population is multifaceted. our program shows that every time a child is given the chance, they can learn. in arkansas there was not much of a european population. all of those kids were achieving. the poverty level was 85%. we are proving again that kids can achieve, given the proper courses and teacher training. host: tom luce, thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you. host: go to our website, c-, to find out the events we are covering today in washington. the president will give his back to school speech at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. a stakeout after meeting with caucus members with mitch mcconnell after the meeting on the small business bill. live coverage on c-span 2. thank you for watching. â™
the maryland political scene. >> the green party candidatt in the race for u.s. senate is killed after she was hit by an suv. Ăș%apened while she was riding her bike. >> 5:30 sunddy morning. greee party candidate for the u.s. senate natasha pettigrew parked her car with bike in tow on the caapus of prince george's community college. first stop before heading out %-while riding south on 202, the avid bike rrder and tri-athlete was hii from behind by a woman driving a cadillac escalade. >> i aw smoke coming from the front of the suv. >> crystal hayes saw it all. >> pulled ooer, i didn't wantĂș them to notice e noticing them. -o kept going. >>the driver of theeescalade spee off. and drove for 4 miles to her Ăș%me. with the bicycle still lodged Ăș%derneath. left behind, natasha pettigrew with crystal by her side. >> she was lying in the roadd she was not responding..3 she was totally unconscious. that, you know, it was okay.3 told her that somebody was on the way. i told herrto keep breathing. >> tte med-acts arrived but natasha died this morning from the njuries. >> a spokesperson or ma
speaking i would appreciate it. tell us your name and any ebullitions you might have. please wait. we have microphones coming around to you. >> thank you. i am mike billington. i do not know if you went to the conference in quantico last week, but at that conference are raise the exact question you have drawn, the elite of the chinese and russians and others that the evidence is an adequate. the response from different generals as we do not need no stinking evidence. [laughter] look at the provocations, it isn't their character, therefore we have to accept this is true. you did not mention the issue, which has concerned me about this, which is why in this area of very high south korean and u.s. and nato anti-submarine warfare facilities and sonar equipment and so forth there appears to have been no son are evidence whatsoever -- no sonar evidence whatsoever? we all know that north korea said they had nothing to do with this, but i am wondering what you did north korea thinks about this. in other words, who could have done it, who in the west? is that the british? whaty is the view of the n
freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 million each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the don't ask, don't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associated with investigations and hearings. the military schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. according to the g.a.o., 8% of the service members let go under don't ask, don't tell held critical occupations defined as services such as interpreters, 3% had skills in an important foreign language such as arabic, farsi or korean. more than 13,000 troops have been dismissed from the military simply because of their sexual orientation since president clton signed this law in 1993. mr. president, soci
yesterday. it reminds me of just how important it is for us to protect our nation. >> the soldiers say they are felt to fight -- proud to fight any day of the year. >> we are very fortunate to be here. there are people who would love to help those freedoms and have those opportunities. >> his unit is now on a bus heading for a debriefing. he should be back with his family for good about mid-week. >> nine years after the 9/11 attacks, the country paused to pay tribute in ceremonies around the country. services at ground zero, the pentagon, and shang still, pa., that the theme of reflection. >> on the ninth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, families gathered as they have every year in new york, virginia, and pennsylvania. near ground zero, family members read each name of loved ones lost. >> my father. >> the public ceremony included personal and emotional tributes. family members, firefighters, and first responders walked down into the ground zero construction site carrying photographs and laying flowers on the reflecting pool. president obama spoke about the recent mosque cont
for years and they have elected me to that. >> in new hampshire -- >> u.s. civil rights commission is holding a conference on civil rights in the 21st century and includes speeches and panel discussions on various aspects. business leaders and scholars discuss the legal and social tools available for fighting discrimination. >> including continued racial and ethnic disparities in important measures of well-being and success. this discussion obviously includes a consideration of public policy options, both old and new, but it goes beyond public policy by also asking about the limits of government action and what the right mix of government and nongovernment action should be. in a pre-conference conference call with the panel members, we identified the following questions as relevant. they don't have to answer them all, but i'm going to repeat them anyway and if they go off on more brilliant things i might turn them back to a few of these questions. first, beyond rigorous enforcement of anti-discrimination law, ca can and should be done by government to narrow racial and ethnic dispa
with a woman, and the car is using a donut spare tire as one of its wheels. police are asking if you have information to call 9/1. >> a new trial starts this week for the state's revised cang statute. duwan marshall. the judge heard juror's testimony that included alleged misconduct after a jury used the internet to search the suspect's prior criminal record. >> a sheriff's report this weekend for family members of murder victims. to recognize the impact on the victim's -- victims' families. they heard from people that had losses themselves. >> the purpose of this is so we can get healing to our city and also to let our city government know that something needs to be done about the murders on the street to keep the streets safer for our children. >> street -- there was counseling for those who were interested. >> the ninth anniversary of the -- of 9/11. here's 11 news reporter france france -- michelle franzen. >> family and survivors gathered in new york, virginia, and pennsylvania. they read names of each one lost. and at times the public ceremony included personal and emotional tribute
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)